GOAL: ZERO CRASHES INJURIES AND FATALITIES


UDOT is committed to safety, and we won’t rest until we achieve zero crashes, zero injuries and zero fatalities. 

STRATEGIES

Engineering
  • At UDOT, we look for opportunities to improve safety at every phase of a project from planning and design to construction and maintenance. 
  • UDOT engineers use sound design principals, cutting edge national research and best practices that have been proven to produce a safe and reliable transportation system. 
Education 
  • UDOT demonstrates its commitment to safety through outreach efforts that help educate the public and make Utah a safe place to live, travel and conduct business. 
 Employee and Partner Safety 
  • A culture of active caring and behavior-based safety (BBS) is central to building a safe system. 

ENGINEERING 

Every project includes safety elements. In an effort to make safety improvements on every project, UDOT launched a new web-based tool to help project managers easily identify opportunities. The tool utilizes a web-based platform to access and analyze crash data in a streamlined, easy-to-use interface. 

The tools merge multiple data sets including crash, traffic and roadway data from a variety of sources to help users quickly identify crash patterns, analyze roadway segments for areas of varying concern, compare potential roadway projects and develop benefit-cost analysis according to Highway Safety Manual methods. 

The tool also provides a public portal, allowing our partners in law enforcement and local government to view high-level crash data summaries. 

EDUCATION 

As we continue to make Utah roads safer, our role of educating drivers is a critical element of our effort to reduce the 94 percent of fatal crashes resulting from human error. The Zero Fatalities program educates a wide range of audiences about the five behaviors primarily responsible for fatalities on Utah roads: aggressive driving, drowsy driving, distracted driving, impaired driving and failure to use a seat belt. 

The Zero Fatalities program includes tailored campaigns to reach specific audiences such as new teen drivers, parents, commercial vehicle drivers, pedestrians and cyclists. Seat belt use, in particular, remains a focus of educational efforts following the adoption of a primary seat belt law during the 2015 Utah legislative session. 
EMPLOYEE AND PARTNER SAFETY
Behavior-Based Safety (BBS) is an innovative program that focuses on human behavior to minimize injuries, prevent fatalities and decrease the costs associated with safety incidents. More than 90 percent of all injuries are due, in part, to at-risk behaviors; BBS targets these behaviors.

With BBS, employees observe each other on the job and provide safety feedback to reinforce safe work practices and correct risky ones. Behavioral data is then tracked and trended for BBS teams to make improvements. In combination with the safety culture assessment, BBS improves safety culture, safety systems and safety communication. The end result is a more open, positive safety culture and fewer safety incidents. So far, less than a year after implementation, early results show positive change at UDOT in every category.

Traffic Fatalities 2000 - 2015

UDOT has set a goal to reduce fatalities on Utah roadways by 2% each year.  UDOT has met this goal since 2001.

FATALITIES TYPE

(A FATALITY MAY APPEAR IN MULTIPLE CATEGORIES)

Year after year, the top contributing factor in fatal crashes is improper restraint. The number of people that could have been saved by wearing a seat belt represents about half of Utah’s roadway fatalities.

Heat map of Fatalities on Utah Roadways Since 2011

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

UDOT VEHICLE INCIDENTS
UDOT INJURIES REPORTED
UDOT LOST TIME INJURIES OR ILLNESS
TEEN DRIVING BEHAVIORS WITH PARENTS INVOLVED IN TRAINING

Zero Fatalities (ut.zerofatalities.com)
More than half (56 percent) of those who are aware of Zero Fatalities say this program has influenced them to avoid the top behaviors responsible for deaths on the roads.

One of the most important achievements of the Zero Fatalities program is educating new drivers and their parents about safe driving. Through a targeted sub-campaign, Don’t Drive Stupid (dontdrivestupid.com), and mandatory parent attendance at Parent Night classes, nearly 20,000 parents and students were reached last year.

Zero Fatalities - $2.8M
Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAP) (udot.utah.gov/snap)
The SNAP program helps encourage healthy Utahns, cleaner air and better traffic by getting cars off the road and students walking to school. SNAP’s Walking School Bus app, launched in August of 2014, has helped significantly increase the number of children walking and biking to school. Since its launch, users have walked 143,000 miles and reduced 163,000 car trips. The app has been honored with 18 national awards, including the prestigious Silver Anvil Award.

SNAP - $710K
Truck Smart (udot.utah.gov/trucksmart)
Efforts include a mass media campaign and an emphasis on education of new drivers. The Truck Smart program partners with local driver education programs and the Utah Trucking Association to teach teens about driving safely around trucks. One of the most impactful elements of the class is the opportunity to sit in the cab of a commercial truck, typically provided by members of the Utah Trucking Association. Truck Smart has worked with nearly 200 driver education classes in the past year.

Truck Smart - $115K

FEATURE FOCUS

Primary Seat Belt Law & Partnerships for Outreach
During the past five years more than 1,000 people have died on Utah’s roads; the most common contributing factor was failure to properly buckle up. A relatively small percentage of our population continues to travel unbuckled, but they represent nearly half of our roadway fatalities (excluding pedestrian, cyclists and motorcyclists, who don’t have the option of buckling up).

National data demonstrates that seat belt usage typically increases in states with primary seatbelt laws. In 2015, Utah’s legislature voted to help keep our roads safer by passing a primary seat belt law.

Since the primary seat belt law went into effect, UDOT and the Utah Department of Public Safety (UDPS) are continuing in their partnership to increase education and enforcement to help save lives. UDPS performed two Click It or Ticket (CIOT) enforcement periods in 2015 to leverage momentum around the new legislation and increase public awareness.

The Law: All passengers must wear seat belts and children up to age 8 must be properly restrained in a car or booster seat.
SEAT BELT USAGE TRENDS
The Zero Fatalities program is focusing its efforts on increasing seat belt education through a broad range of platforms targeting diverse demographics. Efforts include grassroots presentations, media campaigns, social media, local media coverage, partnerships, community events and pledges. UDOT has also begun utilizing existing overhead freeway signs,
to remind travelers to buckle up.

Each year observational seat belt surveys conducted in June offer indications of increased seat belt usage (up 8 percent from 82 percent), although these results should be considered preliminary. 
A subsequent observational survey in October revealed a slight decline from the June results, with usage rates at 85 percent. UDOT and UDPS will continue with outreach and education efforts to maintain and improve seat belt usage levels. 
In 2015, UDOT began using overhead message boards to share safety messages reminding drivers to buckle up and observe other safe driving behaviors.
Pedestrians, Bicycles & Motorcycles
As Utah residents increasingly desire active transportation options and alternative modes of transportation, the number of fatalities among these users has increased. UDOT and UDPS have partnered to target pedestrians, cyclists and motorcycles. A campaign called Heads Up was developed to target these users and to educate vehicle drivers how to be safe when sharing the transportation system. UDOT and UDPS conducted social media outreach, media events and grassroots education in an effort to reverse the trend of increased fatalities among these users

FATALITIES

Fatality data are as of 10/31/2015. All data are preliminary and subject to change.
TOTAL FATALITIES
BASED ON AN ANNUAL TARGET OF A 2% REDUCTION SINCE 2000
TOTAL FATALITIES PER 100 MILLION VMT
BASED ON AN ANNUAL TARGET OF A 2% REDUCTION SINCE 2000